Apricot Tomato Bruschetta made with Crossover (a rustic saison aged in white wine barrels)

 

First think I’d like to say:

Growing basil and mint is one of the smartest things a home cook can do. They grow like weeds because well, they kind of are. Their abundance of leaves means lots of uses without having to spend a pretty penny at the grocery store. For this recipe, I pretty much picked my whole basil plant. I’m not too worried though, since I know it will be replenished in about 2 weeks. Until then, I’ll be spreading my basil-mint pesto on just about everything.

Continue reading Apricot Tomato Bruschetta made with Crossover (a rustic saison aged in white wine barrels)

BMF Waffle Salad

The third day of waffle week brings a somewhat healthier option: a salad. Yeah, and I even took a bite! Amazing… I know. I actually kind of liked it. But since I didn’t eat the whole thing, I invited some girlfriends over to make sure the recipe was sound – they both agreed it was quite tasty. Since I couldn’t just sit there while they ate, I chowed down on the basil/mint/feta waffle and some leftovers from the BLT-double-E. I think it was a win-win for all of us.

Oh yeah, and as for the name – it has two meanings. First, BMF = basil, mint, feta. Second = well, its three bad words. I realized this after coming up with the abbreviation for the ingredients and thought it was pretty awesome. Children may be reading this blog so I won’t spell it out but I’m sure you can figure it out.

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Munchy-time French Fries (topped with goat cheese, pancetta, basil, and a balsamic reduction)

Since the great holiday of 4/20 just recently happened and I live in Denver (but did not partake) – I decided to create the ultimate munchies recipe: French fries topped with goat cheese, pancetta, basil and a balsamic reduction. You can also make these for drunk munchies but I suggest you have a sober friend help you out. I made them for just regular old get-home-from-school-munchies. No matter what your reason, you’re going to fall in love with this recipe. Even though it contains fried food, the freshness of the basil will somehow trick you into thinking it might possibly be healthy. One suggestion I have is to freeze the potatoes ahead of time so they are ready when you want to cook. You should even freeze extra so you can make French fries all the time because, who doesn’t love French fries?

Continue reading Munchy-time French Fries (topped with goat cheese, pancetta, basil, and a balsamic reduction)

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella and J. Marie Saison

Panzanella is one of the easiest recipes to make and the most delicious. Every bite will taste like a bit of summertime. Since it’s been so cold and groggy lately around the country, I figured I’d post something to cheer everyone up. It is not always possible to find heirloom tomatoes this time of year, but if you can, definitely grab them! Heirloom tomatoes are like the beauty queens of the tomato world. They are colorful, sweet, and just overall better than all the other tomatoes.  This quick fix will surely become one of your favorite meals.

Continue reading Heirloom Tomato Panzanella and J. Marie Saison

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella and J. Marie Saison

Tomato panzanella is one of the easiest recipes to make and the most delicious. Every bite will taste like a bit of summertime. Since it’s been so cold and groggy lately around the country, I figured I’d post something to cheer everyone up. It is not always possible to find heirloom tomatoes this time of year, but if you can, definitely grab them! Heirloom tomatoes are like the beauty queens of the tomato world. They are colorful, sweet, and just overall better than all the other tomatoes.  This quick fix will surely become one of your favorite meals.

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella

How pretty is that?

 

Serving size: 3

IMG_4621

Ingredients:

3-4 Heirloom tomatoes, depending on size

1 red onion (it can be small, you will only need a few slices)

10-20 leaves of fresh basil (a package from the grocery store will do if you aren’t growing it)

2-3 tbsp red wine vinegar OR 1-2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Olive Oil

Ricotta cheese (you will need 3 big spoonfuls)

1 Loaf of day old French bread

Garlic powder

Cracked pepper

 

Directions:

Croutons:

Turn the oven on to high broil. Slice up the loaf of bread and then cut those slices into chunks. You will probably only need half the loaf to make enough croutons for this recipe. Drizzle the bottom of your dish or baking sheet with some olive oil and spread the bread chunks on top. Drizzle the tops of the bread with olive oil and then shake a bit of garlic powder and cracked pepper on top. Pop the bread chunks in the oven until they become golden brown. Make sure to watch carefully because these little babies can go from golden brown to burnt very quickly and no one likes burnt croutons.

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella

Salad:

Cut up the tomatoes into chunks. Julienne the basil, which means cut it into thin strips.

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella

Cut a few thin (3-4) slices of red onion and then chop into small pieces. If you love red onions, add another slice or two. Throw the veggies and basil into a large bowl. As for the vinegar, not everyone has red wine vinegar lying around the house so you can substitute balsamic if that is easier. I made this recipe twice (as you will read later) and I used a different type of vinegar each time. I think balsamic is amazing but it can be a bit stronger tasting than the red wine vinegar, so just use a little less. Cooking is more about tasting and less about measurements so I gave a range for the vinegars. Add a few tablespoons and taste. If you would like more acidity, add another tablespoon or so. Next, add the olive oil. You can also measure this, but I just pour around the bowl twice and it seems to work out just fine. Toss the ingredients until everything is well coated.

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella

When you’re ready to serve, scoop a good amount of the tomato mix into each bowl. Then, add the croutons to the top. Finally, add a big spoonful of ricotta cheese. Add salt and pepper to taste and its ready to eat!

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella

 

 

Beer Pairing: J. Marie Saison/Farmhouse Ale by River North Brewery

This beer pairing was my first fail. When I made this recipe to begin with, I bought Hereafter by Perennial Artisan Ales. I was excited about it because it was from St. Louis, my hometown. I guess I let the excitement and the interesting bottle design cloud my judgment because the flavors did not mix well with the meal. Don’t get me wrong, this is a good tasting ale, it just didn’t add to the dish. Instead of the flavors working together, they were just sitting around, not getting along. On its own, Perennial has a strong taste of pear with a more subtle hint of sage. I was hoping for a bit more sage and dryness out of this one, but was left with too much sweet. It was also a bit sour at first, which I could’ve done without because I already had sourness coming from the vinegar in the dish. In the future, I will buy this beer again but pair it with a more savory meal. In this case, the sweetness of the tomatoes combined with the sweetness of the brew was just too overwhelming.

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella

This is my beer fail ^

 

I chatted with some friends and decided to try again, this time with a farmhouse ale. First of all, this meal looks like it came right out of the garden so I should’ve bought a farmhouse ale to begin with. I went into the beer cave and came out with J. Marie Saison/Farmhouse ale by River North Brewery. According to the reviews on Beer Advocate, people weren’t loving it all on its own. I wouldn’t know. I drank the entire bottle with the meal and it was the best beer pairing I’ve done so far. I mean it was literally PERFECT.  The first thing you will notice is the explosion of basil flavors going on in your mouth. Seriously, this beer takes tomato panzanella to the next level. It also accentuates the pepper on the croutons and the spice of the onion. I found the ale to be refreshing and citrusy with a bit of honey. The small amount of sweetness blended well instead of masking the flavors of the dish. Overall, I would probably eat/drink this combo everyday of my life if I could. It was that good.

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella

Heirloom Tomato Panzanella